PowerbyProxi > Consumer Electronics Solutions

Qi Wireless Charging and Cardiovascular Electronic Devices

July 12, 2016 / 0 Comments / 65 / Consumer Electronics Solutions
qi-ced-blog

We have borrowed this article taken from Wireless Power Consortium blog.  For information on our stance on Wireless charging standards, visit our standards page.

As new classes of electronic devices like phones or wireless chargers are introduced to the market — especially those devices that use radio frequency electromagnetic fields — it’s critical to verify that these new devices are safe when used by people with medical implants.

The limits for safe exposure of the human body to electromagnetic fields are well understood. In the USA, the FCC has set limits for the strength of electromagnetic fields that may be generated by electronic equipment and the FCC enforces the compliance with their certification program.  Products that carry the FCC mark will not expose your body to harmful electromagnetic fields. The FCC has an excellent website and FAQ devoted to this subject. Other countries have similar regulations, certification procedures, and safety marks.

People who wear implantable electronic devices such as pace makers, defibrillators and deep-brain stimulators will not only be interested in the effect of electromagnetic fields on the human body, but also in the potential effect of electromagnetic fields on their implants.

To this end, a recent study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, the compatibility of a Qi wireless charger and cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) was assessed.  The aim of this study was to assess the electromagnetic compatibility between CIEDs and the magnetic field of a common wireless charging technology. To do so, the voltage induced in CIEDs by an A13-type Qi wireless charger fields were measured and compared with the performance limits set by ISO 14117. In order to carry this out, a measuring circuit was developed that can be connected with unipolar or bipolar pacemaker leads. The measuring system was positioned at the four most common implantation sites in a torso phantom filled with physiological saline solution.

The study found that the induced field is well below the limits set by ISO 14117, even at two cm from the Qi transmitter coil (that is the location with the highest the induced field strength). The field strength drops off dramatically with increasing distance. At the more realistic distance of 10 cm, the induced field is only 2% of the field at 2 cm.

While this was not the first such study, it was particularly thorough and corroborates the findings of previous studies that determined Qi wireless charging does not interfere with CIEDs.

Human Safety — the relationship between frequency and power:

The top design factors that determine safety margins are the system’s operating frequency, the power that the system consumes, and the use of magnetic shielding in the product.  As operating frequency increases the resulting electromagnetic field’s potential to interfere with other electronic devices increases (see e.g. the article on PlanetAnalog.com on “Design Considerations in Modern Wireless Power Transfer Systems: Frequency of Operation”). Similarly, as power consumption increases, the electromagnetic field strength increases and with it, the potential to interfere with other electronic devices.

Why is Qi wireless charging safe?

Qi-compatible products run at a low operating frequency (100 kHz to 200 kHz), and consequently, can deliver high power while remaining well within safe limits. Typical Qi transmitters (chargers) deliver up to 15 watts in a configuration where the transmitter coil and receiver coil are aligned and in close proximity. With this configuration, the field strength declines rapidly with distance, much more rapidly than with, for example, Wi-Fi base stations. This configuration significantly reduces the potential for interference with other electronic devices.

The Qi technology has been in high-volume production since 2010, and there are now hundreds of product types and hundreds of millions of users worldwide. With this market maturity comes a wealth of data that independently confirms the safety of products that use the Qi standard.

What’s the big deal about Resonant?

September 16, 2015 / 0 Comments / 155 / Consumer Electronics Solutions, Features
Fady Mgt profile

Wireless power has made significant advancements in the last few years with many inductive technologies becoming mainstream and widely available – notably Qi and PowerMat products. Major players like Samsung are building wireless power receivers into their phones along with a huge number of transmitters widely available from companies like AirCharge, TYLT and of course Samsung themselves. Currently there are nearly 700 different products on the market that are Qi certified alone.   

However, inductive wireless charging is not without its limitations – amongst them include slower charging speed and the requirement for precise alignment of the receiver (smartphone) and transmitter (wireless charger). This is where resonant technology can deliver a number of advantages and truly represents the future for charging wirelessly. Unlike inductive technologies, there are still zero finalized resonant products in the marketplace. A4WP has long promised an option and now the Wireless Power Consortium is in the process of developing a resonant specification called Resonant Qi. I’ve been working on the specification personally along with other top member companies at the WPC. The new Resonant Qi specification will overcome existing limitations with Inductive Qi and provide those consumer benefits which OEMs are looking to integrate into their devices.

What’s most important?

The discussion on how inductive and resonant perform must be framed in respect to what is valued by the end user. Specifically, what are the factors that will increase the appeal of wireless charging for the consumer?

  • Speed: Is the technology able to charge at the same or better speed than current wired chargers?
  • Multiple devices: Are you able to charge multiple devices (and multiple types of devices) at the same time?
  • Efficiency: How much power being delivered from the source is actually getting through to the device and not being lost? Will it still work efficiently if it is integrated into the surfaces of furniture etc.?
  • Alignment (spatial freedom): Are you able to charge devices in multiple positions and orientations on the charger (X & Y axis)?  Or does it require precise alignment of the device?  How does it perform on the Z axis over greater height?
  • Power level: Can the technology charge a range of devices – including higher power devices (>10W)?
  • Design: Can it be integrated into devices through miniaturized receivers, without the need for charging cases or sleeves?
  • Safety:  Does the technology meet stringent industry guidelines i.e. 1998 and the 2009 ICNIRP (International Council on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection)?  Safety is determined  by how much radio frequency (RF) exposure can be applied without being harmful to human health.  
  • Interference: Will the technology affect the operation of the devices themselves, or peripheral devices and appliances?  Specifically, are the EMF and EMI below industry limits?
  • Interoperable: Will the technology be able to work with existing wireless charging solutions currently on the market?

Based on the above factors, how do inductive and resonant technologies stack up?

I have used examples of current inductive products that we find on the market today (Qi and PMA) to compare functionality and performance with the Resonant Qi specification, currently in the works – see Table 1 below:

Resonant comp

Overall, resonant presents a wireless charging future with greater convenience, performance and flexibility.  The main areas where we will see the greatest advantages are:

  • Faster charging – You can’t charge atwired speeds” if you are wasting energy as heat. Either you just won’t get enough power or you will cause you phone to overheat because you exceeded its thermal budget.  This is why, for example, when using the Galaxy S6’s wireless charger, the phone is charged approximately 1:30 hours slower than when I plug it into the wall (it takes 2:55 hours instead of 1:25 hours). A wired charger is 2.2x faster than the current inductive wireless charger. With Qualcomm’s wired quick charger technology and the new USB standard now available this is going to be even more important in the future.
  • Multi-device charging – Inductive systems can only charge one device at a time. Resonant systems can charge many devices simultaneously and at different power levels.  This makes it particularly useful for shared-use environments like table tops in the home or office.
  • Full Spatial freedom – For all three axis, x, y and z. One of the benefits of resonant technology is that it makes it really easy to drop and go, as well as charge through table tops or furniture. One of the biggest complaints about inductive charging is the requirement to precisely align the device. This is why inductive transmitters tend to have sticky rubber rings on their surface. This stops your device sliding off the charge when you bump your bedside table, for example.

Resonant Qi technology provides the next evolution to an already widely available set of products. It will provide a noticeable step-up in performance over the current inductive solutions, and will help wireless charging technology become more pervasive. Today, inductive solutions continue to be the only option for consumers wanting to purchase their own wireless charging system despite a lot of noise from other rival resonant standards. One has to ask why there are no (zero!) A4WP products shipping in the market to date.

The key for the WPC, and arguably the industry at large, will be to deliver a Resonant Qi specification that remains fully compatible with the hundreds of millions of existing Qi products on the market, while also delivering greater user performance over inductive systems. This approach puts the consumer first, and the best technologies always do.

Is 2015 Finally the Year Where Wireless Power Goes Mainstream?

March 13, 2015 / 0 Comments / 79 / Consumer Electronics Solutions, Features
Qi_logo_with_clear_zone_820_wide

Fady Mishriki, CEO.

It has been an incredibly exciting start to 2015 with several major announcements in wireless power along with several noticeable absences…

Just last week we saw the first major smartphone manufacturer (major by market share) embed wireless charging into their flagship device. Samsung has decided to build in the WPC’s Qi technology into their flagship Galaxy S6 and S6 edge device. Qi wireless charging will be supported out of the box by Samsung for the first time. These new smartphones will also support PMA. This is sometimes called “dual-mode.” As a WPC steering group member this is great news. You may be surprised to hear me say that, but it really is.

What it means is that companies making a significant investment to deploy infrastructure in coffee shops, cars, airports, home furniture and so on, can make those investments with confidence. There is no longer any fear or uncertainty regarding which standard major smartphones will adopt.

These dual-mode phones are and will continue to drive demand for Qi transmitters. It’s not hard to see why. Qi caters to the widest range of applications and offers a clear path forward to resonance whilst guaranteeing full backwards compatibility. Brands like IKEA, AirCharge, McDonalds, Chargespot, Marriott, Toyota to name few are all choosing Qi transmitters. That’s right – Qi only transmitters. In fact, there are over 682 Qi certified devices today.

The WPC called out a few key stats in its recent Press release:

  • 15 cars have Qi chargers built in, or available as a factory installed option. Examples include the new 2016 Toyota Camry and the 2015 Jeep Cherokee.
  • 80% of car manufacturers by volume will release cars with support for Qi.
  • Google wireless charging transmitters on Amazon – almost every option you see is Qi and there are so many great options to choose from. Some of my favourites are the TyltAircharge and Nokia ranges.

With the Samsung Galaxy S6 joining the Qi club, today almost every single smartphone manufacturer (except Apple, Levono and Xiaomi) has a flagship device with Qi wireless charging built in. This includes LG, HTC, Google Nexus, Microsoft and Motorola.

Aircharge’s recently launched app is a great way to find Qi charging spots around the world. It shows that there are over 3,000 locations in a wide variety of locations supporting Qi and this is only the beginning. Businesses are paying to install Qi. To put that in context, the PMA has 200 noted locations –all within Starbucks locations. The noticeable absence of the A4WP camp is also interesting. A4WP has no products in the market to date.

Why then did PMA select A4WP as its resonance path forward given how similar WPC and PMA technology are? As an engineer and technologist, it’s hard to see how PMA and A4WP technologies can result in a single truly interoperable standard. One can always co-house systems, but that’s not a cost effective solution – nor is it likely to fit in a modern day smartphone.

Additionally, you may find it interesting that most of the press seems to have misinterpreted the merging of two standards organisations as the merging of two standards – which it is not.

When we hosted the Wireless Power Consortium in Auckland in January, the Resonant Qi Specification was made available to its 200+ member companies. We were pleased to host the meeting for the second year and contributed a significant amount of our technology, intellectual property and expertise to deliver a highly efficient, backwards-compatible, resonant wireless charging system.

We now we have the world’s first resonant system compatible with the most widely deployed wireless power standard. That’s extremely exciting as it provides companies like Samsung a clear path to Resonant Qi with full backwards compatibility to Inductive Qi.

The advancement includes safety features such as foreign object detection, even with multi-device systems, as well as an industry leading 70%+ total system efficiency for a fast and effective charge.

PowerbyProxi’s new evaluation kit is a single design which supports both Resonant Qi and Inductive Qi modes, providing a clear way forward for the growing number of OEMs who are integrating the WPC’s Qi standard into their smartphones and other devices.

2015 is already off to a fast start and is going to be an incredibly exciting year for wireless power. One that we will look back on as a tipping point in the industry.

Proxi-2D EVK Development Kit now available

February 19, 2015 / 0 Comments / 40 / Consumer Electronics Solutions, Features
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PowerbyProxi is delighted to announce the availability of our latest evaluation kit for consumer electronic devices – The Proxi-2D EVK Development Kit

This Development Kit represents the next step in resonant technology with higher efficiency, advanced foreign object detection and Qi v1.1 certification.

The Proxi-2D represents a critical next step in the advancement of the Qi specification and shows consumers the possibility of an integrated, resonant system that is backwards compatible with existing Qi devices.

This release reflects overwhelming demand from our customers and partners to accelerate technology development for greater flexibility and convenience for wireless charging, including extending the existing Qi standard.

The Proxi-2D includes a single transmitter and two receivers.  Both the transmitter and receiver can operate in resonant and Qi mode, and are interchangeable with Qi devices.

Included in the kit are spacers to showcase z height testing of the devices at 3, 5 and 7mm, as well as software to enable real time testing and monitoring of both the transmitter and receiver.

Dual mode functionality enables three configurations – testing of Resonant receivers on our resonant transmitter, Qi receivers on our resonant transmitter and finally our resonant receiver on a Qi transmitter.

Resonant Receivers operating on Resonant Transmitter

The first use case allows customers to test with multiple resonant receivers on our resonant transmitter.  Built-in intelligence means the resonant transmitter automatically detects when the receiver has been placed on the pad, powering only those coils which lie directly under the device.

The system is able to deliver up to 7.5Watts of power to each receiver – highlighting the ability to charge larger devices such as phablets and tablets. Core technology features including Multi-device charging and full spatial freedom enable multiple receivers to be charged simultaneously in any location on the transmitter.

Qi Receiver operating on Resonant Transmitter

The second configuration allows for testing of Qi receivers on our dual mode resonant transmitter.  Any current Qi phone on the market can be charged but with added functionality of full spatial freedom for placement anywhere on the charging surface.

The transmitter is able to detect the type of receiver and delivers the required power to the device – up to 5W for current Qi devices.

Resonant Receivers operating on Qi Transmitters

The third configuration enables backward compatibility with current Qi transmitters.  Our dual mode resonant receivers detect the type of transmitter and switch to operate in Qi mode

In such instances, the resonant receiver detects the Qi pad and switches to Qi mode – drawing between 3.5 – 5 watts of power depending on the Qi transmitter.

For each configuration, users are able to monitor and measure the performance of the system, including individual coil status on the transmitter and overall current and voltage characteristics in each mode.

For more information on the development kit and to receive updates on further advancements, please visit the Proxi-2D EVK page.

Proxi-2D EVK Development Kit Contents

September 9, 2014 / 0 Comments / 60 / Consumer Electronics Solutions
Kit box1

On the back of the recent release of our resonant Proxi-2D EVK Development Kit, this video looks to provide a bit more insight into the technology behind the transmitter and receiver.

The EVK Development Kit includes ten key components packaged in two layers.  Aside from the transmitter and receiver units, the kit includes, two 2mm spacers, a Power supply for the Tx, USB to Serial cable, Adaptor board, Ribbon cable, Mini USB cable and IEC power cord.

 

Setting up the Transmitter:

Setting up the transmitter for use is as simple as connecting the provided power cable.

The Tx consists of a single controller circuit board and coil array.  At the front there are three LED indicators that designate different operating states.  The center red LED indicates when power is being supplied to the transmitter.  The Blue LEDs on the either side will indicate if the when the board is scanning for devices and when charging is occurring.

At initial start up, the transmitter will perform an initial Board scan to detect any receivers that are on the surface of the pad.  Once powered, the board will continuously perform a loop detection to check if an object has been placed on, or removed from the transmitter pad.  A board scan is performed whenever the loop detection detects a receiver being placed on the charging surface. This scan is highlighted by both blue LEDs flashing for three seconds.  During this process a Digital ping is performed on each coil in the Transmitter array to check whether there is a receiver present.

Depending on where a receiver is placed, an LED will stop flashing and remain on – indicating that power is being transferred to a receiver.  The transmitter will enter Resonant mode if a Proxi-2D receiver is detected, otherwise it will enter Inductive or Qi mode if a Qi version 1.1 receiver is detected.

Resonant Receiver module:

The Receiver module itself consists of an Rx coil and circuit board placed inside a plastic sleeve or enclosure.  A series of five labeled LED indicators on the circuit board designate the amount of power being transferred to the receiver as well as the mode of operation.  In this instance the receiver is operating in Resonant mode and is receiving 5Watts of power from the transmitter.

The Rx receives a signal from the Proxi-2D Tx which will inform it to switch to Resonant mode, otherwise it will assume that it has been placed on a Qi Transmitter and will operate in Inductive or Qi mode.

Extended Z Height Testing:

Included within the kit are two 2mm clear spacers. These spacers enable for users to test the system at three different Z heights or coil to coil distances – 3mm, 5mm and 7mm.  The different spacing is achieved by simply inserting spacers between the Rx and Tx boards.  The system will perform in the exact same manner at the different heights.

In our next video we will explain how to set up the system for testing and highlight the functionality of our unique control application software.

Proxi-2D EVK-1 Evaluation Kit now available

August 13, 2014 / 0 Comments / 64 / Consumer Electronics Solutions, Features
2D EVK-1.3

PowerbyProxi is delighted to announce the availability of our latest evaluation kit for consumer electronic devices – The Proxi-2D EvK-1

This kit represents the next step in wireless charging with dual mode functionality for both resonant and Qi technologies. Users will be able to experience resonant charging that is compatible to the existing Qi 1.1 standard, currently available on the market.

The Proxi-2D represents a critical next step in the advancement of the Qi specification and shows consumers the possibility of an integrated, resonant system that is backwards compatible with existing Qi devices.

This release reflects overwhelming demand from our customers and partners to accelerate technology development for greater flexibility and convenience for wireless power and charging, including extending the existing Qi standard.

The Proxi-2D includes a single transmitter and two receivers.  Both the transmitter and receiver can operate in resonant and Qi mode, and are interchangeable with Qi devices.

Included in the kit are spacers to showcase z height testing of the devices at 3, 5 and 7mm, as well as software to enable real time testing and monitoring of both the transmitter and receiver.

Dual mode functionality enables three configurations – testing of Resonant receivers on our resonant transmitter, Qi receivers on our resonant transmitter and finally our resonant receiver on a Qi transmitter.

Resonant Receivers operating on Resonant Transmitter2D EVK-1.2

The first use case allows customers to test with multiple resonant receivers on our resonant transmitter.  Built-in intelligence means the resonant transmitter automatically detects when the receiver has been placed on the pad, powering only those coils which lie directly under the device.

The system is able to deliver up to 7.5Watts of power to each receiver – highlighting the ability to charge larger devices such as phablets and tablets. Core technology features including Multi-device charging and full spatial freedom enable multiple receivers to be charged simultaneously in any location on the transmitter.

Qi Receiver operating on Resonant TransmitterEVK-1 with Qi phone 1

The second configuration allows for testing of Qi receivers on our dual mode resonant transmitter.  Any current Qi phone on the market can be charged but with added functionality of full spatial freedom for placement anywhere on the charging surface.

The transmitter is able to detect the type of receiver and delivers the required power to the device – up to 5W for current Qi devices.

Resonant Receivers operating on Qi Transmitters2D EVK-1.4

The third configuration enables backward compatibility with current Qi transmitters.  Our dual mode resonant receivers detect the type of transmitter and switch to operate in Qi mode

In such instances, the resonant receiver detects the Qi pad and switches to Qi mode – drawing between 3.5 – 5 watts of power depending on the Qi transmitter.

For each configuration, users are able to monitor and measure the performance of the system, including individual coil status on the transmitter and overall current and voltage characteristics in each mode.

For more information on the evaluation kit and to receive updates on further advancements, please visit the Proxi-2D EVK-1 page: http://powerbyproxi.com/evaluation-kits/proxi-2d-evk-1/

Major Milestones for v1.2 Resonant Specification

August 5, 2014 / 0 Comments / 29 / Consumer Electronics Solutions
Leeuwarden

Posted on Wireless Power Consortium website 

WPC’s v1.1 specification, supported by the largest ecosystem comprising over 200 member companies, enables the most efficient and cost-effective wireless power solutions based on inductive power, close-coupled technology.

WPC’s Resonant Task Force (RTF) will deliver an extension for WPC v1.1 specification for a best-in-class magnetic resonance technology to address applications that require multi-device charging, increased spatial freedom, increased charging at distance (Z-height), and devices that are designed for different power levels.

The RTF has set high goals for backward compatibility to existing v1.1 specification, efficiency, transmitted power, FOD, thermal design, and other critical parameters. Meeting these goals would result in the most advanced and compelling products addressing a broad set of applications such as smartphones, tablets, PCs, wearables, automotive, and infrastructure.

Members saw significant achievements and progress at WPC’s Leeuwarden meeting in June, last month.  After hundreds of combined engineering hours by 5 of the world’s leading companies, here’s what happens with an open standards organization when the best minds in the industry collaborate:

  • Q1.1 receivers based on inductive v1.1 specification and charging at a Z-height of 7 mm, are now capable being charged at a Z-height of 30 mm
  • New magnetic resonance v1.2 receivers can now be charged at Z-height of 45mm, expecting further Z-Height in final production designs
  • Backward compatibility between Qi v1.1 and Qi 1.2 systems (v1.1 receivers charging on v1.2 transmitters, v1.2 receivers charging on v1.1 transmitters), allowing consumers protection of investment
  • Multi-device V1.2 Receivers charging on a v1.2 transmitter with one inverter, delivering lowest cost designs


Figure 1 – Multiple manufacturers demonstrating Qi1.1 and Qi1.2 resonant systems


Figure 2 – LG v1.2 resonant Tx’s delivering power to v1.1 inductive Rx and v1.2 resonant Rx


Figure 3 – LG resonant Tx delivering power to PowerbyProxi resonant Rx


Figure 4 – Philips resonant Tx delivering power to PowerbyProxi resonant RX at distance of 45mm Z height


Figure 5 – Convenient Power Tx delivering power to PowerbyProxi resonant RX at distance of 18mm Z height

The plug-fest was festive indeed!

The WPC is an open standards organization enabling the use the best ideas from any company. That’s why Qi sets the standard for wireless power transfer.

Tony Francesca
Chairman of the Resonance Taskforce

The Future of Wireless Power with PowerbyProxi

February 7, 2014 / 0 Comments / 26 / Consumer Electronics Solutions, Features
pbp-vid

PowerbyProxi designs the world’s most advanced and safest wireless charging technology for consumer electronics and industrial applications.  In this video we show our vision for the future of wireless charging in the home, and highlight how wireless power can provide greater convenience for consumers.

Click here to learn more about wireless power and our wireless power technologies.

Partnerships, Investment and moving house

October 7, 2013 / 0 Comments / 31 / Consumer Electronics Solutions, Features
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There are a lot of exciting things happening of late at PowerbyProxi and in the broader wireless power industry – all in all it has kept me very busy and is partly the reason my last blog post was 3 months ago! (my travel manager tells me I have flown over 160,000 kms to meet with our many customers and partners).

All those air miles later, it is a particular privilege to welcome Samsung, who join TE Connectivity as one are our strategic partners in wireless power – more on that later.

Two weeks ago, to cope with exponential growth, our Auckland office (where all our clever R&D is done) moved across Victoria Park into our big new home at 43 College Hill, Freemans Bay Bay in Auckland. The dreaded move went seamlessly thanks to our wonderful Executive Assistant.

A few days prior to that move, we also welcomed Qualcomm to the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) at their Qingdao, China meeting. At that meeting Tony Francesca (our VP of Business Development, Consumer Technologies) was also appointed to Chair the WPC’s Resonance Task Force (part of the Low Power Working Group).

The most exciting thing however is that last week we announced our strategic partnership with Samsung – after a courtship that lasted a couple of years. When we founded the company in 2007, we knew that Consumer Electronics was going to be a key market for us, but it was still too early for the technology back then.  This partnership is further evidence that wireless power is fast becoming mainstream in Consumer Electronics.

For me personally, this marks the commercial realization of work that started many years ago when I was a student at The University of Auckland. We are now well positioned to leverage our wireless power technology (find out more info on wireless power) in both the consumer and industrial market segments with Samsung and TE Connectivity as strategic partners respectively.

The deal consists of an equity investment from Samsung Venture Investment in addition to a strategic licensing agreement with Samsung Electro-Mechanics.

It is certainly a very exciting time for us at PowerbyProxi. The partnership with Samsung in particular is significant for us given they have also been one of the earliest proponents of wireless power. Many Galaxy and Note smartphones have had wireless charging ports as standard for some time now, as an example.

In announcing the deal, Vice President, Hugh Kim, Director of Wireless Charging Development said “Our research identified PowerbyProxi as a leader in wireless power technology based on its expertise, track record and comprehensive patent portfolio.”

The partnership will enable us to leverage our wireless power technology and IP to deliver the best user experience to a mass audience. We are certainly excited to be working with Samsung.

With so much of what we do under wraps, it’s nice to be able to share some of the exciting things going on at PowerbyProxi. We have more major announcements coming out soon so keep your eyes peeled!

Fady Mishriki is Co-Founder, EVP and Chief Tesla Officer of PowerbyProxi

Interoperability – you know you want it

June 10, 2013 / 0 Comments / 30 / Consumer Electronics Solutions, Features
IMG_2218

Last week I travelled to Taipei for Computex 2013 to demonstrate our latest Qi compatible wireless charging technology.  What we presented was a wireless receiver that can be charged on multiple Qi transmitters, including our next generation wireless charging pad enabling multi-device charging and full spatial freedom with full Qi interoperability.

You can see the demo itself in this video which highlights our intention for it to become integrated directly into smartphones – as we have demonstrated in our Proxi Integrated Smartphone Solution previously.

However, what the demo and the underlying technology essentially shows is not only a pathway towards a better, more advanced Qi standard – but more importantly, the first step towards what everybody ultimately wants from wireless charging – interoperability.

It is something our customers have requested from us and we have set on the path to deliver – while maintaining the advantages that our Dynamic Harmonization Control technology provides.

Interoperability means that consumers have the ability and confidence to use multiple smartphones on any (Qi) compatible charging pad with the knowledge that it will not only charge, but do so efficiently and reliably.  Unlike wired chargers, wireless by nature provides the opportunity to break free from model-specific charging connectors – people want to buy one pad which will charge all their phones, anywhere, without discrimination.

PowerbyProxi made a conscious choice to join the WPC in May to push the advancement of what we considered to be the leading wireless charging standard in the market (Qi) so that consumers can experience fully functional, flexible, convenient, and ultimately superior wireless charging sooner.  We have only been a member for a few weeks but have already started demonstrating results that show how our multi-device and spatially free charging systems are interoperable with Qi.

You can be sure that as a member of the WPC we will continue to work with it’s members extend the specifications and the functionality of the current Qi standard while ensuring greater compatibility within the Qi ecosystem.  Ultimately keeping the consumer our number 1 priority.

Fady Mishriki is Co-Founder, EVP and Chief Tesla Officer at PowerbyProxi

 

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